Kato Kaelin Now Believes O.J. Simpson Was Guilty Of The Double Murders

By Nigel Boys

When Nicole Brown and Ron Goldman were found dead outside her Brentwood, Los Angeles home in June 1994, it led to the “trial of the century” as the prosecution tried to prove that her former husband, O.J. Simpson, was the culprit.

Although the former football star was found not guilty, Kato Kaelin, an aspiring actor who was living in Simpson’s guest house at the time of the killings, now states that he believes the 68-year-old was the person who committed the killings. Kaelin, whose real name is Brian Jerard, was supposed to be a witness for the prosecution during the now-infamous 1995 case, but was ruled a hostile witness due to his inconsistent testimony.

The Daily Mail reports that in an interview with Barbara Walters for Investigation Discovery’s “Barbara Walters Presents American Scandals,” Kaelin stated that he believed the jury had made a mistake.

Kaelin, who is now 56-year-old, told the 86-year-old Walters, who was with him at the time Simpson’s not guilty verdict was released, he believes the man who is now incarcerated at Lovelock Correctional Center, Nevada, was guilty of the murders.

O.J. was convicted and sentenced to 33 years in a Nevada case involving the theft of his own sport memorabilia and was found liable in the death of Brown and Goldman in a civil lawsuit brought by their families.

“I remember that because you asked me off camera, you said, ‘What do you think?’ and I whispered into your ear, I said ‘I think they made a mistake,’” Kaelin told Walters, The People reports.

“Yes, I think they did,” Kaelin said in the new interview which aired on Monday. “In my opinion, yes I think he is guilty,” he said when pushed further on the issue. “In hindsight, I think that O.J. Simpson is guilty.”

Kaelin’s inconsistent testimony did not help establish a time period when Simpson was away from his house and could have committed the killings as the prosecution hoped, which led some to believe that he was actually trying to help the defense.

“I could only say what I knew and that’s what I testified to, my opinion about his guilt is my opinion,” Kaelin told Walters.

ABC News reports that Kaelin, a friend of both Simpson and Brown, said at the time of the trial that he had shared a takeout meal with O.J. on the night of the murders. “O.J. Simpson came by my door in my guest house and he knocked on my door… and we ended up going to McDonald’s,” he said.

Based on Kaelin’s testimony, O.J. and Kaelin returned from getting food at 9:36 p.m. on the night of the murders.

Prosecutors argued that since Simpson then separated from Kaelin, who went to his bungalow while Simpson went to his house, the former football star had plenty of time to commit the crimes. Simpson was not seen again until a limousine arrived to take him to the airport one hour and 10 minutes later.

However, Kaelin told Walters that he was with Simpson when the limo arrived, helping him prepare for his flight.

“I was helping pack stuff into the limo because he was going to Chicago,” Kaelin told Walters. “And there was a bag that was ready to be packed, and he said ‘Don’t touch that bag,’ and that bag was never found.”

“I don’t know what was in there but something in there was enough for O.J. Simpson to say ‘Don’t touch,’” Kaelin said, although he didn’t say if he thought the bag contained the alleged murder weapon.

Although Simpson was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages in a wrongful death civil suit brought against him in 1997 by the families of Brown and Goldman, he has not paid one single penny, according to Goldman’s father, Fred Goldman.

Simpson was arrested in Las Vegas in September 2007 and sentenced to 33 years in prison for armed robbery during the attempt to steal sports memorabilia he claimed belonged to him. He will be eligible for parole in October 2017.

“O.J. Simpson, he’s very much a character out of a Shakespeare play,” Kaelin told Walters. “Here’s a man who had everything and lost everything and became from adored athlete to pariah.”

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